Cloud Outage Drama: The Microsoft Cloud Just Went Down Across The World

Microsoft (MSFT) announced on Wednesday that all of its cloud services have been restored after a networking issue caused its Azure cloud platform and other widely used applications like Teams and Outlook to go offline.

Services throughout the Americas, Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Africa were affected, according to the status page for Azure. Only China’s services and its platform for governments escaped damage.

The Microsoft Wide Area Network should have fully recovered by late morning, according to Azure, and the majority of customers should have seen services return (WAN).

According to Microsoft data, Azure has 15 million corporate clients and over 500 million active users. If Azure goes down, several services might be affected, which could then affect practically all of the biggest businesses in the world.
Microsoft (MSFT) announced on Wednesday that all of its cloud services have been restored after a networking issue caused its Azure cloud platform and other widely used applications like Teams and Outlook to go offline.

Services throughout the Americas, Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Africa were affected, according to the status page for Azure. Only China’s services and its platform for governance Following the pandemic, which led to an increase in people working from home, businesses have become more and more dependent on internet platforms.

Microsoft has previously stated that it had discovered a network connectivity problem with devices throughout the Microsoft WAN. Both client-to-Azure internet connectivity and data centre service connectivity are impacted, according to the statement.

Later, Microsoft tweeted that it was employing “extra infrastructure to hasten the recovery process” after rolling back a network update that it thought was the root of the problem.
Microsoft withheld information about how many customers were impacted by the outage, however data from outage monitoring website Downdetector revealed that there were thousands of occurrences occurring across continents.

Cloud Outage Drama: The Microsoft Cloud Just Went Down Across The World

 

The Downdetector website collects status reports from many sources, including users, to keep track of outages.
The cloud division of Microsoft had supported its fiscal second-quarter earnings on Tuesday. Despite concerns that the lucrative cloud segment for big IT companies could be severely impacted as clients attempt to cut spending, it predicted third-quarter sales in its so-called intelligent cloud business will be between $21.7 billion and $22 billion.

According to projections by BofA Global Research, Azure’s share of the cloud computing market will increase to 30% in 2022, falling short of Amazon’s AWS.

Microsoft announced this week that it was eliminating over 10,000 employees, joining other major tech corporations in using layoffs as a means of weathering the worse economy.

Pre-market trading saw a 2.4% decline in its shares.

Big Tech platform outages are widespread; businesses as diverse as Google and Meta have experienced service interruptions. Last year, interruptions were experienced by Azure, the second-largest cloud services provider after Amazon.
Users had issues accessing any Teams programme functionality, including the ability to exchange messages or join calls, during the outage. Many customers used Twitter to communicate information about the service disruption, with the hashtag #MicrosoftTeams becoming popular.

More than 280 million people worldwide use Microsoft Teams, which is a crucial component of daily operations for businesses and educational institutions that utilise the service to conduct calls, plan meetings, and manage their workflow.

There were little indications of a big interruption at major UK financial services companies, where Microsoft Teams is used in conjunction with a number of messaging systems from suppliers like Movius and Symphony to link employees in the office with those who work remotely.

Two London-based insiders who work for two big international banks claimed not to have even seen a problem.

The Frankfurt Stock Exchange’s operator, Deutsche Boerse Group, claimed that there had been no effect on trade. In a statement, Commerzbank AG (CRZBF) (CBKG), situated in Frankfurt, stated that Microsoft was looking into a number of issues affecting the bank.

Microsoft Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and OneDrive for Business were among the other services impacted, according to the company’s status page.

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